Palpitations of Dust Poster 2

“Palpitations of Dust” Wins Best Experimental Film for Prince of Prestige Academy Award, & is Selected for Screening at Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival, Action on Film Festival, & Near Nazareth Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust Wins Best Experimental Film for Prince of Prestige Academy Award, & is Selected for Screening at Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival, Action on Film Festival, & Near Nazareth Festival

August 2017: Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust won Best Experimental Film for the Prince of Prestige Academy Award for 2017! 

Huang says that her debut film is solely based on her pure lyrical poems. That her biggest challenge of adapting her poetry from page to big screen was to render a narrative arc from non-lineal surrealistic poems. “Chance, happenstance, and energy of synchronicity are the centerpiece of this project, interweaving and juxtaposing frail humane emotions such as love, longing, and belonging.”

Films submitted to the Prince of Prestige Academy Award were nominated through a selection committee. The top scorers were reviewed by the festival jury and winners were announced on Saturday, July 29, 2017. More information about the Prince of Prestige Academy Award as well as other film categories and nominees can be viewed on the PAECA website as well as on IMDB

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Palpitations of Dust has also been officially accepted to be screened at the the Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival (HDIFF) and Action on Film Festival (AOFFEST). Both events will run concurrently and will host black tie award celebrations from August 24th through August 26th, 2017 at the Palms Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

HDIFF is an international film festival that brings together talented experts and newcomers from film, entertainment, and writing. More information about the festival can be found here. The Action on Film Festival is an annual event that features films from all genres including features, shorts, experimental, animation, music videos, and action sequences. Learn more about AOFFEST here.

Action on Film 2017 Acceptance Laurels

Palpitations of Dust is also a semi-finalist for the 2nd annual Malta Film Festival this year. The festival will take place on August 24th and 25th, 2017 at Eden Cinemas, located in St Julian’s, Malta. The Malta Film festival features a selection of diverse films from Europe, South America, as well as the rest of the world. More information can be found here.

Malta Semifinalist

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust has been selected for the Near Nazareth Festival in the Experimental Category for Winter 2017. The film showcases five surrealist poems and will be screened at the festival which will take place in Afula, Israel from December 13th through December 17th, 2017.

The Near Nazareth Festival has been ranked as one of the 100 Best Reviewed Festivals on FilmFreeway and features work by filmmakers from 70 different countries. The Experimental category for the Near Nazareth Festival can be viewed here.

2017_Participant (1)

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

Palpitations of Dust Poster 2

“Palpitations of Dust” is Selected for Synimatica’s Short Film Festival & California Women’s Film Festival, Nominated for World Music & Independent Film Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust is Selected for Synimatica’s Short Film Festival & California Women’s Film Festival, Nominated for World Music & Independent Film Festival

July 2017:  Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust has been officially selected for the first annual Synimatica Short Film Festival in the Narrative category. The screening will take place during the week of July 15th through July 30th, 2017 via Synimatica’s online viewing platform which streams digitally on on Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, and Amazon Fire.

Screening and panel judging for the festival is done online and the best-in-category films will be honored at an awards mixer in Boise, Idaho. Synimatica will feature short films by Ann Huang and other emerging filmmakers. Palpitations of Dust will be available through Synimatica’s online viewing platform. In addition to narrative short films, the festival will also feature documentary and animated films.

More information about Synimatica’s Short Film Festival can be viewed here.

Palpitations of Dust has also been officially selected for the California Women’s Film Festival (CWFF). The film showcases five surrealist poems and will be screened at the festival which will take place in Los Angeles, California at the Acme Theater from July 14th – July 16th, 2017.

The CWFF is a bi-annual event that showcases the work of women filmmakers, artists, and writers. More information about the festival can be viewed here.

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust has been nominated by the World Music & Independent Film Festival (WMIFF) in 3 categories. Eric Stoner and Tatiana Rozo have been nominated for Best Actor, Dean Nathan is nominated for Best Cinematography, and Ann Huang received a nomination for Best Director in a Short Film.

This year’s Annual Awards Gala for WMIFF will be held from July 22nd through July 30th, 2017 on an 8-night Caribbean cruise. The gala will screen Palpitations of Dust as well as other films that have been nominated.

The festival was created in 2010 as a platform to celebrate the achievements of all cinema artists and has been an IMDB-qualifying event each year. Additional information about the World Music & Independent Film Festival can be found here.

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

Palpitations of Dust Poster 2

2017 Nice Independent Filmmaker & Auckland International Film Festivals Nominate & Screen “Palpitations of Dust”

Ann Huang FilmmakerContact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 2017 Nice Independent Filmmaker & Auckland International Film Festivals Nominate & Screen “Palpitations of Dust”

June 2017: The 2017 Nice International Filmmaker Festival nominated Ann Huang for their Talented New Filmmaker Award. In addition, her film “Palpitations of Dust” was nominated for Best Cinematography in a Short Film. The film was screened on May 18, 2017 in Nice, France.

View the screening schedule: http://filmfestinternational.com/may-18th-room-1-nice-iff-2017/

Since 2006 the festival has given Indie Filmmakers a platform to showcase their work. From humble beginnings in Tenerife, they now host events in some of Europe’s most renowned cities, including Nice, London, Amsterdam, Madrid, Berlin, and Milan.

The festival is a week-long showcasing of films that concludes with an awards ceremony gala dinner, where winners from each of category receive a prestigious trophy in recognizing their talents and achievements.

The renowned festivals also include workshops, guest speakers, film premieres, director Q&As, networking events, and much more. The events support filmmakers around the world by establishing and connecting a profoundly rich community of like-minded individuals.

Learn more about the festival in Nice as well as upcoming festivals in other cities by visiting http://filmfestinternational.com/

The Auckland International Filmmaker Festival jury selected Ann Huang’s film, “Palpitations of Dust,” for their autumn session awards.

The acclaimed Auckland Film Festival provides support to independent film-makers through reviewing, judging, marketing, and networking. In addition, the festival aids filmmakers in overcoming any obstacles which potentially hinder the artist’s ability to create.

Visit http://www.aiff.co.nz/ to learn more.

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

Meshes of the Afternoon by Maya Deren

Poetry & Film Fuse in the Works of Maya Deren

Meshes of the Afternoon by Maya Deren

One of the most influential filmmakers in American cinema and a pioneer in dance films, Maya Deren (1917-1961) believed the function of film was to offer a viewer an experience that would evoke new conclusions. As with her poetry, Deren’s focus continually evolved and remained dynamic as she combined her interests in subjective psychology, dance and Haitian culture in her short films. Deren’s best-known and most influential experimental film, Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), beautifully combines poetic elements with cinematic devices. In 2015, the BBC hailed it as one of the top 100 greatest American films. Deren’s popular cinematic works also include At Land, Ritual in Transfigured Time, Meditation in Violence, and A Study in Choreography for Camera.

Maya Deren best expressed her view of the freedoms of independent cinema when she said, “Artistic freedom means that the amateur filmmaker is never forced to sacrifice visual drama and beauty to a stream of words…to the relentless activity and explanations of a plot…nor is the amateur production expected to return profit on a huge investment by holding the attention of a massive and motley audience for 90 minutes…Instead of trying to invent a plot that moves, use the movement of wind, or water, children, people, elevators, balls, etc. as a poem might celebrate these. And use your freedom to experiment with visual ideas; your mistakes will not get you fired.”

‘Meshes of the Afternoon’ and its Influence

Using a second-hand Bolex camera, Deren and husband Alexander Hammid created Meshes of the Afternoon. It was the first narrative work in avant-garde American film, establishing the New American Cinema. The editing and filming techniques used in the short have a deep sense of rhythm and create a sense of continued motion through discontinued space, conveying a deeper meaning of discomfort and distrust. The abandoning of the concepts of space and time in the film, the juxtaposition of shots, and multiple views of “self” convey a stream of consciousness that breaks viewer expectations.

Compelling themes throughout Deren’s work include reflection, dreaming, vision, ritual, identity and rhythm. Meshes of the Afternoon directly inspired David Lynch, John Coney, Su Friedrich, Stan Brakhage, Kenneth Anger and other major traditional and experimental filmmakers.

Deren on the Freedoms of Independent Cinema

When discussing the liberties of independent cinema, Deren was opposed to Hollywood’s practices and standards. She felt that artistic freedom meant never sacrificing visual beauty and drama to spoken lines and explanations of plot. Deren took advantage of movements that happened naturally—the wind blowing, balls bouncing, water running—rather than invent plots. She stated that when an artist uses his or her freedom to experiment with visual ideas, mistakes are forgiven.

At the 1953 Poetry and Film Symposium, Deren stated that poetry “is an approach to experience.” She explained that a poem’s structure makes it distinct. Its construct is the result of a situation’s vertical investigation, as it looks into a moment’s implications, qualities and depth. Deren stated that the result is poetry that doesn’t focus on what’s happening, but on how a situation feels or means.

Filmmaker and Poet, Ann Huang, has long been inspired by the Deren’s works. Cinematic and poetic visions influenced her first film, Palpitations of Dust. Reviews received from a film festival’s screening committee further support that Huang’s work reflects the freedom ideas promoted by Maya Deren:

“Interesting juxtaposition of the actors and artwork with the poems.”

“Loved the dichotomy of the Renaissance art with the visuals of the film.”

Surrealists suggest that art is a part of life. Therefore, it is vital that filmmaking be viewed as pure and keen as automatic writing or poetry writing. Poetry, filmmaking and other forms of art make the invisible, undocumented moments in an individual’s life tangible. For example, these moments are eloquent yet mysterious, wise yet innocent, and charismatic yet elusive. The portion of existence that survives without an audience must be preserved for an artist to remain whole.

heart wood blocks

5 Emotional and Physical Health Benefits of Poetry

Heart wood blocks
For decades, researchers have studied the effects of expressive writing, such as poetry, on mental and physical health. The results often showed that those who engaged in writing about emotions had better psychological and physical outcomes than those who wrote about neutral topics, according to Karen A. Baikie and Kay Wilhem in an August 2005 issue of Advances in Psychiatric Treatment. Reading and writing poetry fills the soul. Regularly immersing yourself in the form of expression has a range of additional short- and long-term benefits that are too beneficial to ignore.

Benefits of Poetry on the Body and Soul

1. Improved Cognitive Function

Cognition is the act of understanding and acquiring knowledge by experiencing, thinking and sensing. Poetry improves cognitive function because it exposes you to new words and ways to express yourself. It makes you examine a poet’s words to gain an understanding of the idea communicated. If a poem uses meter, you might even find yourself doing a bit of math. Writing poetry strengthens cognitive processes as you search for the right words, find ways to express your thoughts and fine-tune the work’s rhythm. When you write poetry in response to an event that occurred in your life, the art form will help you organize and structure your memories. Writing also helps increase working memory capacity, which also helps improve cognitive processing.

2. Healing Emotional Pain

Losses that stem from a myriad of situations cause some of the most painful emotions that humans experience. These losses breed some of the most inspirational poems. Poetry promotes emotional expression and healing as it makes you explore your feelings. Writing gives you a safe, healthy way to vent and understand your feelings. By putting emotions into words, you confront it, memorialize losses and make your feelings tangible.

3. Increased Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is the knowledge that you have about your feelings, strengths, weaknesses, beliefs, motives, desires and character. It helps you understand yourself and others, as well as how others perceive you. Poetry is a powerful vehicle in the search for yourself. It improves self-awareness as it puts you in tune with your heart and mind. It helps you be more aware of your actions, emotions and the roots of your problems. Even writing about issues that seem insignificant can help you discover trends in your life that you can change or embrace.

4. Improved Self-Expression

Reading and writing poetry strengthens language and communication skills. It helps you find your voice and communicate your emotions, giving you a new sense of empowerment. Poetry gives you a flexible way to express yourself using powerful tools, such as metaphors, that reflect your internal world. Creative visualization and projective identification allow you to access the healing power of your imagination, creating a lifeline when emotions seem overwhelming. Everyone has memories to face and stories to tell. Writing poetry can help you begin a dialogue with yourself and resolve issues that created roadblocks.

5. Reduced stress

Writing has always been hailed as a cathartic and therapeutic practice with a range of benefits to emotional and personal growth. When used as a therapeutic tool, writing poetry can also reduce stress in the body and mind. Stress increases cortisol, adrenaline and glucose levels in the body. It affects digestion and alters the immune system, putting you at risk for various health problems, according to the Mayo Clinic. Reading and writing poetry helps you reduce stressors in your life and manage the impacts they have on you, which may help improve your overall health and wellbeing.

Surrealist Poems about Emotional Breakthroughs and Strength

Max Ernst

By Paul Eluard
In a corner agile incest
Circles the virginity of a little dress.
In a corner the sky turned over
To the spines of the storm leaves white balls behind.

In the brightest corner of every eye
We’re expecting the fish of anguish.
In a corner the car of summer
Immobile glorious and forever.

In the light of youth
Lamps lit very late.
The first one shows its breasts that red insects are killing.

Awakenings

By Robert Desnos

It’s strange how you wake sometimes in the middle of the night in the middle of sleep someone has knocked on a door And in the extraordinary city of midnight of half-waking
and half-memory heavy gates clang from street to street

Who is this nocturnal visitor with an unknown face
what does he seek what does he spy
Is he a poor man demanding bread and shelter
Is he a thief is he a bird
Is he a reflection of ourselves in the mirror
Back from a transparent abyss
Trying to re-enter us

Then he realizes that we’ve changed
that the key no longer turns in the lock
Of the mysterious door of bodies
Even if he’s only left us for a few minutes
at the troublesome moment when we put out the light

What does he become then
Where does he wander? does he suffer?
Is this the origin of ghosts?
the origin of dreams?
the birth of regrets?

No longer knock at my door visitor
There’s no room on my hearth or in my heart
For the old images of myself
Perhaps you recognize me
I’ll never know how do you recognize yourself

Less Time

By André Breton

Less time than it takes to say it, less tears than it takes to die; I’ve taken account of everything, there you have it.
I’ve made a census of the stones, they are as numerous as my fingers and some others;
I’ve distributed some pamphlets to the plants, but not all were willing to accept them.
I’ve kept company with music for a second only and now I no longer know what to think of suicide, for if I ever want to part from myself, the exit is on this side and, I add mischievously, the entrance, the re-entrance is on the other.
You see what you still have to do.
Hours, grief, I don’t keep a reasonable account of them; I’m alone, I look out of the window; there is no passerby, or rather no one passes (underline passes).
You don’t know this man? It’s Mr. Same.
May I introduce Madam

Madam? And their children.
Then I turn back on my steps, my steps turn back too, but I don’t know exactly what they turn back on.
I consult a schedule; the names of the towns have been replaced by the names of people who have been quite close to me.
Shall I go to A, return to B, change at X? Yes, of course I’ll change at X.
Provided I don’t miss the connection with boredom!

There we are: boredom, beautiful parallels, ah! how beautiful the parallels are under God’s perpendicular

poetry translation

How Culture and Literature Intertwine During Poetry Translation

poetry translationIn the United States, a trainer is an individual who teaches skills. In Great Britain, it is an athletic shoe. A bog in the U.S. is a swamp. In Great Britain, it’s a toilet. In Oregon, a buggy is an old-fashioned term for a stroller, horse carriage or car. In North Carolina, it’s a modern term for a shopping cart.

Even when nations speak the same language, the cultures within it greatly influence what different words mean. When translating poetry, an individual must take a broad idea that can be interpreted in many different ways and translate it into a recognizable, familiar idea that remains true to the original text. The skill is a subject activity and multi-faceted process tangled with linguistic and cultural restraints that lends itself to new interpretations that the original poet may have never imagined.

Cultural Considerations When Translating Poetry

Literary and Cultural Understanding and Bias

One of the most challenging tasks when translating poetry is communicating culture-specific ideas because a translation isn’t just affected by the poet’s culture, but also the translator’s understanding of and biases toward the poet’s and target’s culture. Ancient Romans understood this during their conquests. To introduce Romans to Greek culture, for example, Roman translators carefully imitated Grecian stylistic elements to keep the literature as faithful to the original literature as possible. After conquering Greece, however, Roman translators did not feel the need to pay as much attention to preserving the integrity of the original texts. Instead, they adapted the texts as a way of demonstrating Roman literary achievements. As a result, the translations didn’t serve as an imitation or interpretation; they were the competition. The translations accommodated Roman views of Grecian society. This was not the first culture to do this, nor will it be the last.

Metaphors

Metaphors are one of the most important elements of figurative language and are often ripe with culture-specific undertones. They contain the core of a poet’s message and serve as a source of enrichment for the target audience. Because metaphors often relate to a culture’s customs and history, they may create unique difficulties in translations.

Metaphors born of traditions, religious beliefs, geographical surroundings, environment and historical events are sometimes difficult to translate. In English, for instance, the word dog is relatively neutral. An individual might say a lottery winner is a lucky dog. In Chinese, the word dog may have a derogatory connotation and be a word used to describe someone who is snobby or mean. When a metaphor in the original language does not make sense in the target language, an individual might have to translate metaphors using similes to retain the original idea or image.

Allusions

Allusions in poetry can be just as difficult, if not more difficult, to translate if the cultures in question did not share the same history or texts. When an Arab poet alludes to Qu’ranic texts, for example, a Western reader might not understand the scriptural origins. In such instances, a translator might have to provide a reader with footnotes, glossary or other notes to explain the context of the idea.

Translating the nuances found in poetry is a complicated yet vital task. When a translator sees culture as a collection of experiences that give daily life its form, the individual links more than just words; she links worlds.

Palpitations of Dust Poster 2

Award Nominated “Palpitations of Dust” Announces Additional Screening

Contact
Ann Huang
Filmmaker

Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

The 8th Annual Taste Awards : Praise Continues for “Palpitations of Dust”

Ann Huang

February 21, 2017: This star-studded event acknowledged outstanding excellence in video, film, mobile and interactive content focused on food, drink, fashion, design, travel, health and lifestyle. Nominated film “Palpitations of Dust” was described as one of the most innovative and exciting festival discoveries. Click to learn more about the film from the Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival and view more event photos.

Award Nominated “Palpitations of Dust” Announces Additional Screening

 

February 2017: A new screening of Ann Huang’s film “Palpitations of Dust” has been scheduled at the Hollywood Reel Independent Film festival on Monday, February 20, 2017 in Regal Cinema LA LIVE. The film, written and adapted by Ann Huang, explores the lives of three friends, which become complicated when facing choices of love, friendship, need and reciprocity. Learn more about the festival and purchase tickets at http://hollywoodreelindependentfilmfestival.com/.

Ann Huang’s film has also been nominated for a Taste Award. The Taste Awards are original awards for the Lifestyle Entertainment Industry and the highest awards for creators, producers, hosts, and directors. The Award recognizes and acknowledges outstanding excellence in video, film, and more.

The Taste Awards Reception/Ceremony takes place on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 in Beverly Hills where the winner will be announced.

VIP red carpet reception includes presentation ceremony and announcement, gift bags and more. Tickets are available for purchase online at http://www.thetasteawards.com/events/.

 

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://www.annhuang.com/blog/.

brown film spiral

Transmedia Storytelling–How to Promote Your Poetry or Experimental Film (Part II)

brown film spiral
Last month, I introduced you to my experimental film Palpitations of Dust (https://vimeo.com/180268104), which has won recognition at film festivals. When you’re ready to release your film, it isn’t enough to premier it in a theater if you want it to draw attention. You must take steps to promote it and make it appealing to your audience. Therefore, what you do after completing an experimental film is just as important as the film itself. By knowing marketing basics, you can turn your passion into a profitable venture.

Marketing Your Experimental Film

If you are serious about filmmaking, you must treat your craft like a business. You cannot make a film and hope that it will do well in the theater and make sales online. You must take steps to showcase your unique vision and create a buzz. Those steps depend on information, such as your audience’s:

  • Age
  • Geographic location
  • Preferred movie genres
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Gender
  • How they consume information
  • Preferred social media platforms

In today’s technological age, you will find that your audience consumes information from a number of sources because they also want to feel as if they have a role in what you offer. This is where transmedia storytelling comes into play. The marketing technique helps set your film apart from the other noise on the Internet by using multiple media platforms to transport your message into your audience’s daily life. By using transmedia storytelling, you transition from telling a story to making one with your audience.

With Palpitations of Dust, I used poems that I wrote in the past, film festivals, video-on-demand and social media to make the story come together. Ideas that others use to market their own films include:

  • Creating a film festival strategy
  • Entering a film for an award
  • Showing teasers and trailers on social media platforms just prior to releasing the film to create a sense of excitement
  • Hanging posters and handing out fliers in the community where you plan to premier the film
  • Creating a website and social media pages dedicated to the film
  • Using social media before and after a screening to connect with your audience and keep the conversation going
  • Submitting the film to VOD services and television networks
  • Hosting special screening events
  • Email marketing and flyer for promotion purposes
  • Submitting press releases to local newspapers and news websites, such this one (http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/11/prweb13821729.htm) for Palpitations of Dust

Do You Need an Agent or Publicist?

The answer to this question depends on your needs. An agent is an individual who takes care of the business aspects of your endeavor so you can focus on the creative aspects. These professionals negotiate contracts, give guidance, and provide creative feedback. They learn about your goals and devise a plan to help you meet them. They can also connect you to other professionals that you might need for a film, such as producers. If filmmaking is a hobby, you might not need an agent. If it is a serious career, an agent can prove invaluable.

Hiring a publicist is a good idea if a major film festival screens your experimental film. This individual can help you develop strong publicity materials, get you in touch with the right press contacts, manage festival publicity and marketing campaigns, raise your film’s media profile, arrange interviews, and maximize the exposure your film receives.

The only thing more exciting than writing poetry or making a film is sharing your talents with others. Strategic transmedia storytelling will help get the ball rolling by expanding the narrative that you create into the lives of your audience, making your fans your greatest evangelists and assets.

spiral film strip from movie

Where to Promote Your Poetry or Experimental Film (Part I)

spiral film strip from movieTransmedia storytelling is a popular trend that you may have experienced without knowing it. It encompasses dispersing a work or parts of a work across multiple platforms to provide an audience with a unified, coordinated experience. The Hunger Games is a great example in which Lionsgate and Campfire used billboards, social media, videos, fan challenges, websites and cinemas to tell the complete story about the universe in which the movie characters live. If you are a writer or filmmaker, you don’t need to collaborate with a major film studio to promote your own work. In 2016, I released the experimental film Palpitations of Dust (https://vimeo.com/180268104). By using outlets available to the public, I successfully promoted my film and engaged its audience.

Transmedia Storytelling Basics

In transmedia storytelling, the platforms used to promote your works contribute to its unfolding story. In Palpitations of Dust, I narrated poems that I published in the past to give viewers an enhanced and more immersive experience. Because I used different platforms to promote the film, I gave my audience different points of entry to experience it, as well as an invitation and incentive to immerse themselves in the world that I created.

The Best Poets to Pitch Your Experimental Film

Many experimental films combine different types of art in a manner that might seem unconventional. Along with using actors and paintings in Palpitations of Dust, I narrated poems that I wrote. Many filmmakers use poems written by other artists. Often, the best poets or poetry laureates to pitch your film to are individuals you know. The poet laureate I worked with was Jean Valentine who has been my mentor in New York, and Ralph Angel who has been my teacher for the last two years, based in Los Angeles.

Promoting Your Experimental Film

Theaters

Good theaters to premier your films in are those that routinely show experimental films, such as community theaters and art houses, because they already have an audience that’s interested in your genre. Some of these theaters are part of or have a relationship with college campuses with active film programs.

Film Festivals

Film festivals are great for showing your work to the world because they have an audience that wants to see it. Festival screenings are also ideal because they naturally create buzz about films and the talents behind them. Below are some of the popular festivals for short films in the United States and around the world:

I recently had the honor of winning the Best Experimental Film award at the 2016 Los Angeles Film and Script Festival for Palpitations of Dust, as well as an Award of Recognition in the experimental film category at IndieFEST. The film is also nominated for Official Selection: Best Mini Film or Documentary at the TASTE AWARDS, which will announce the winner in February 2017.

Palpitations of Dust is pre-selected for the first annual Pacific Coast Premier and the Near Nazareth Festival. I also screened the film at the Oasis Short Film Festival, which showcases the emerging talent of the next generation filmmakers who don’t necessarily have big budgets or industry-filmmaker connections to be recognized.

Raindance, iFilmfest and the Underground Film Journal are great resources that list several festivals for screening experimental films.

Online Streaming Video Services

Video-on-demand, or VOD, services are great ways to give your audience a way to view a film from any device with an Internet connection. The most popular platforms include:

Sonnyboo lists media outlets that seek short films. PBS also lists popular digital self-distribution options that do not have a curation process.

Visit my blog next month to learn more about transmedia storytelling and how to promote your experimental film.

Screenshot from Ann Huang's film, Palpitations of Dust

Ann Huang’s “Palpitations of Dust” Receives Best Experimental Film Award

Contact

Ann Huang

Independent Filmmaker

Phone: (949) 280-5290

huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Ann Huang’s “Palpitations of Dust” Receives Best Experimental Film Award

 

November 2016: Ann Huang’s film “Palpitations of Dust” has received the Best Experimental Film Award at the Los Angeles Film and Script Festival.

The film will be screened at The Complex Theater in Hollywood California at the Fall 2016 Los Angeles Film and Script Festival on November 5th 2016. Tickets are available for purchase online at http://www.lafilmtickets.info/Tickets.html.

Written and adapted by Ann Huang, the five surrealist poems in one presentation represents the continuous and infinite patterns of a life in dreams and the dreams demanding synchronicity from it.

In the film, three friends’ lives become complicated when facing choices of love, friendship, need and reciprocity. Everything is hung on a thin string– from desire to love, to dream, to face life’s disarrays, and then to settle on an unexpected destiny.

Eric Stoner co-produced, served as the art director, locations manager, and was a lead actor in the production. Tatiana Rozo acted and served as an assistant editor. Dean Nathan served as the cinematographer/DP, editor, sound editor, and did the digital effects.

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.