“Palpitations of Dust” is Selected for Festival Angaelica, Preselected for Rome Film Awards & Madrid Art Film Festival, & on the Short List for Cinema London Film Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust is Selected for Festival Angaelica, Preselected for Rome Film Awards & Madrid Art Film Festival, & on the Short List for Cinema London Film Festival

September 2017: Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust has been officially selected for this year’s Festival Angaelica, which will take place at Big Bear Lake in California from September 18th through September 24th.

Angaelica is a non-profit organization with roots in ecology and art that believes in the power of storytelling. The festival helps artists and collaborators connect through film and other projects. More information about the festival can be viewed here.

Festival-Angaelica-2017-Official-Selection-White-Background copy

 

Palpitations of Dust has also been preselected for the 2017 Rome Film Awards (RFA) which will take place from October 28th through 29th in Rome, Italy at Detour Cinema.

The festival highlights the best films of Italy, Europe, and the rest of the world. More information about the RFA can be found here.

rome film awards preselected 2017

 

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust is in the short list for the 2nd annual Cinema London Film Festival which will be held on September 22nd in London. The festival aims to increase diversity in European countries and promote the art of cinema all around the world. Cinema London screens self-financed films by a diverse group of filmmakers from several different countries. More information about the festival can be found here.

Semifinalist

 

Lastly, Ann Huang’s film has been preselected for the 2nd annual Madrid Art Film Festival which will take place on September 29th and September 30th, 2017 in Madrid, Spain.

The festival offers multiple award categories including best screenplay, best cinematography, best director, and best narrative short and celebrates art and film from around the world. More information about the the Madrid Art Film Festival can be viewed here.

Semi-finalist

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang is a filmmaker based in Newport Beach, Southern California. Huang was born in Mainland China and raised in Mexico and the US. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored one chapbook and two poetry collections. Huang’s debut experimental short film “PALPITATIONS OF DUST” won the Best Experimental Film in 2017 PAECA (Prince of Prestige Academy Award), Best Award in Los Angeles Film & Script Festival, and Best Experimental Film in LA Cinema Festival of Hollywood. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

“Palpitations of Dust” Wins Best Experimental Film for Prince of Prestige Academy Award, & is Selected for Screening at Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival, Action on Film Festival, & Near Nazareth Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust Wins Best Experimental Short Film for Prince of Prestige Academy Award, & is Selected for Screening at Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival, Action on Film Festival, & Near Nazareth Festival

August 2017: Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust won Best Experimental Film for the Prince of Prestige Academy Award for 2017! 

Huang says that her debut film is solely based on her pure lyrical poems. That her biggest challenge of adapting her poetry from page to big screen was to render a narrative arc from non-lineal surrealistic poems. “Chance, happenstance, and energy of synchronicity are the centerpiece of this project, interweaving and juxtaposing frail humane emotions such as love, longing, and belonging.”

Films submitted to the Prince of Prestige Academy Award were nominated through a selection committee. The top scorers were reviewed by the festival jury and winners were announced on Saturday, July 29, 2017. More information about the Prince of Prestige Academy Award as well as other film categories and nominees can be viewed on the PAECA website as well as on IMDB

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Palpitations of Dust has also been officially accepted to be screened at the the Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival (HDIFF) and Action on Film Festival (AOFFEST). Both events will run concurrently and will host black tie award celebrations from August 24th through August 26th, 2017 at the Palms Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

HDIFF is an international film festival that brings together talented experts and newcomers from film, entertainment, and writing. More information about the festival can be found here. The Action on Film Festival is an annual event that features films from all genres including features, shorts, experimental, animation, music videos, and action sequences. Learn more about AOFFEST here.

Action on Film 2017 Acceptance Laurels

Palpitations of Dust is also a semi-finalist for the 2nd annual Malta Film Festival this year. The festival will take place on August 24th and 25th, 2017 at Eden Cinemas, located in St Julian’s, Malta. The Malta Film festival features a selection of diverse films from Europe, South America, as well as the rest of the world. More information can be found here.

Malta Semifinalist

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust has been selected for the Near Nazareth Festival in the Experimental Category for Winter 2017. The film showcases five surrealist poems and will be screened at the festival which will take place in Afula, Israel from December 13th through December 17th, 2017.

The Near Nazareth Festival has been ranked as one of the 100 Best Reviewed Festivals on FilmFreeway and features work by filmmakers from 70 different countries. The Experimental category for the Near Nazareth Festival can be viewed here.

2017_Participant (1)

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

“Palpitations of Dust” is Selected for Synimatica’s Short Film Festival & California Women’s Film Festival, Nominated for World Music & Independent Film Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust is Selected for Synimatica’s Short Film Festival & California Women’s Film Festival, Nominated for World Music & Independent Film Festival

July 2017:  Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust has been officially selected for the first annual Synimatica Short Film Festival in the Narrative category. The screening will take place during the week of July 15th through July 30th, 2017 via Synimatica’s online viewing platform which streams digitally on on Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, and Amazon Fire.

Screening and panel judging for the festival is done online and the best-in-category films will be honored at an awards mixer in Boise, Idaho. Synimatica will feature short films by Ann Huang and other emerging filmmakers. Palpitations of Dust will be available through Synimatica’s online viewing platform. In addition to narrative short films, the festival will also feature documentary and animated films.

More information about Synimatica’s Short Film Festival can be viewed here.

Palpitations of Dust has also been officially selected for the California Women’s Film Festival (CWFF). The film showcases five surrealist poems and will be screened at the festival which will take place in Los Angeles, California at the Acme Theater from July 14th – July 16th, 2017.

The CWFF is a bi-annual event that showcases the work of women filmmakers, artists, and writers. More information about the festival can be viewed here.

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust has been nominated by the World Music & Independent Film Festival (WMIFF) in 3 categories. Eric Stoner and Tatiana Rozo have been nominated for Best Actor, Dean Nathan is nominated for Best Cinematography, and Ann Huang received a nomination for Best Director in a Short Film.

This year’s Annual Awards Gala for WMIFF will be held from July 22nd through July 30th, 2017 on an 8-night Caribbean cruise. The gala will screen Palpitations of Dust as well as other films that have been nominated.

The festival was created in 2010 as a platform to celebrate the achievements of all cinema artists and has been an IMDB-qualifying event each year. Additional information about the World Music & Independent Film Festival can be found here.

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

poetry translation

How Culture and Literature Intertwine During Poetry Translation

poetry translationIn the United States, a trainer is an individual who teaches skills. In Great Britain, it is an athletic shoe. A bog in the U.S. is a swamp. In Great Britain, it’s a toilet. In Oregon, a buggy is an old-fashioned term for a stroller, horse carriage or car. In North Carolina, it’s a modern term for a shopping cart.

Even when nations speak the same language, the cultures within it greatly influence what different words mean. When translating poetry, an individual must take a broad idea that can be interpreted in many different ways and translate it into a recognizable, familiar idea that remains true to the original text. The skill is a subject activity and multi-faceted process tangled with linguistic and cultural restraints that lends itself to new interpretations that the original poet may have never imagined.

Cultural Considerations When Translating Poetry

Literary and Cultural Understanding and Bias

One of the most challenging tasks when translating poetry is communicating culture-specific ideas because a translation isn’t just affected by the poet’s culture, but also the translator’s understanding of and biases toward the poet’s and target’s culture. Ancient Romans understood this during their conquests. To introduce Romans to Greek culture, for example, Roman translators carefully imitated Grecian stylistic elements to keep the literature as faithful to the original literature as possible. After conquering Greece, however, Roman translators did not feel the need to pay as much attention to preserving the integrity of the original texts. Instead, they adapted the texts as a way of demonstrating Roman literary achievements. As a result, the translations didn’t serve as an imitation or interpretation; they were the competition. The translations accommodated Roman views of Grecian society. This was not the first culture to do this, nor will it be the last.

Metaphors

Metaphors are one of the most important elements of figurative language and are often ripe with culture-specific undertones. They contain the core of a poet’s message and serve as a source of enrichment for the target audience. Because metaphors often relate to a culture’s customs and history, they may create unique difficulties in translations.

Metaphors born of traditions, religious beliefs, geographical surroundings, environment and historical events are sometimes difficult to translate. In English, for instance, the word dog is relatively neutral. An individual might say a lottery winner is a lucky dog. In Chinese, the word dog may have a derogatory connotation and be a word used to describe someone who is snobby or mean. When a metaphor in the original language does not make sense in the target language, an individual might have to translate metaphors using similes to retain the original idea or image.

Allusions

Allusions in poetry can be just as difficult, if not more difficult, to translate if the cultures in question did not share the same history or texts. When an Arab poet alludes to Qu’ranic texts, for example, a Western reader might not understand the scriptural origins. In such instances, a translator might have to provide a reader with footnotes, glossary or other notes to explain the context of the idea.

Translating the nuances found in poetry is a complicated yet vital task. When a translator sees culture as a collection of experiences that give daily life its form, the individual links more than just words; she links worlds.

5 Things to Know about Transcendentalist Poetry

view of natural area

In the early 19th century, transcendentalism, a philosophical movement that got its start in Massachusetts, offered a cultural alternative to American materialism. The group of individuals in the Transcendental Club placed importance on simple living, intellect and intelligent conversations. Members included writer such as Ralf Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Louisa May Alcott, Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau. They wrote in a manner that was distinctly different from anything that ever came out of Europe. Their philosophy was simple: All people equally have knowledge about themselves and their world that goes beyond, or transcends, what they can hear, see, feel or taste. By understanding more about the movement, you will gain a better appreciation for the works that came out of the movement.

Facts about Transcendentalist Poetry

The source of knowledge: Transcendentalists believed that the imagination, contemplation of the internal spirit, and intuition were the sources of knowledge, as opposed to empirical sources or logic, because individuals can trust themselves to know what is right. These ideas were not necessarily religious beliefs, but ways of understanding life and relationships.

Roots in Immanuel Kant: The roots of transcendental philosophies, which provided a new way to understand knowledge and truth, trace back to Immanuel Kant’s teachings. The great German thinker often focused on what one could never know for sure. He stated that one had the ability to determine if something was true or false and use the knowledge to shape their view of the world. He encouraged skepticism among scientific advances, as science cannot answer all questions.

Connected to the universe: Transcendentalists believed that just as all individuals are in the universe, each person has the universe in his or her soul. The inside of a person’s soul mirrors their environment, and vice versa. For example, if you feel happy, the sun shining in the sky reflects your mood. When it starts to rain, you might feel sad.

Non-conformity: Transcendentalism largely focuses on individualism. The followers believed that unhappiness stemmed from trying to conform to social pressures. The only way to find true happiness is to pursue your own path because you are the only one who truly knows yourself.

Focus on nature: Transcendentalists feared that industrialism distracted individuals from nature. To them, nature was the only place in which they could be themselves, and therefore understand themselves, because nature doesn’t apply social pressures or standards. Because nature doesn’t judge, it is the one place where an individual is most free. This focus on nature influenced conservationists who later fought to establish national parks and other natural areas.

Through their words, transcendental poets paved the way for seeing the American experiment as one that involved self-reliance and individualism. Their progressive, liberal ideas started discussions about abolition, women’s right, equality for all, education and reform. They created a new awareness that drove an American Renaissance about a decade before the Civil War. While the movement didn’t last long, the ideas generated revived American literature and fueled minds for decades.