Independent Filmmaker Ann Huang to Attend 2017 American Film Market

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Filmmaker Ann Huang to Attend 2017 American Film Market

Ann Huang from Saffron Splash Media, writer and director of experimental short films Palpitations of Dust and Inedible Winter, will be attending the 2017 American Film Market. This year’s conference will be held from November 1st through November 8th in Santa Monica, California. 

American Film Market is Hollywood’s largest international conference and cultivates tremendous insight and knowledge among fellow independent filmmakers, global thought leaders, and other industry professionals. The conference hosts producers, writers, directors, production houses, and film enthusiasts from 80 countries for a week of networking, workshops, roundtables, and speakers.  

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang is a filmmaker based in Newport Beach, Southern California. Huang was born in Mainland China and raised in Mexico and the US. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored one chapbook and two poetry collections. Huang’s debut experimental short film “PALPITATIONS OF DUST” won the Best Experimental Film in 2017 PAECA (Prince of Prestige Academy Award), Best Award in Los Angeles Film & Script Festival, and Best Experimental Film in LA Cinema Festival of Hollywood. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

“Palpitations of Dust” is Selected for Festival Angaelica, Preselected for Rome Film Awards & Madrid Art Film Festival, & on the Short List for Cinema London Film Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust is Selected for Festival Angaelica, Preselected for Rome Film Awards & Madrid Art Film Festival, & on the Short List for Cinema London Film Festival

September 2017: Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust has been officially selected for this year’s Festival Angaelica, which will take place at Big Bear Lake in California from September 18th through September 24th.

Angaelica is a non-profit organization with roots in ecology and art that believes in the power of storytelling. The festival helps artists and collaborators connect through film and other projects. More information about the festival can be viewed here.

Festival-Angaelica-2017-Official-Selection-White-Background copy

 

Palpitations of Dust has also been preselected for the 2017 Rome Film Awards (RFA) which will take place from October 28th through 29th in Rome, Italy at Detour Cinema.

The festival highlights the best films of Italy, Europe, and the rest of the world. More information about the RFA can be found here.

rome film awards preselected 2017

 

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust is in the short list for the 2nd annual Cinema London Film Festival which will be held on September 22nd in London. The festival aims to increase diversity in European countries and promote the art of cinema all around the world. Cinema London screens self-financed films by a diverse group of filmmakers from several different countries. More information about the festival can be found here.

Semifinalist

 

Lastly, Ann Huang’s film has been preselected for the 2nd annual Madrid Art Film Festival which will take place on September 29th and September 30th, 2017 in Madrid, Spain.

The festival offers multiple award categories including best screenplay, best cinematography, best director, and best narrative short and celebrates art and film from around the world. More information about the the Madrid Art Film Festival can be viewed here.

Semi-finalist

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang is a filmmaker based in Newport Beach, Southern California. Huang was born in Mainland China and raised in Mexico and the US. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored one chapbook and two poetry collections. Huang’s debut experimental short film “PALPITATIONS OF DUST” won the Best Experimental Film in 2017 PAECA (Prince of Prestige Academy Award), Best Award in Los Angeles Film & Script Festival, and Best Experimental Film in LA Cinema Festival of Hollywood. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

“Palpitations of Dust” Wins Best Experimental Film for Prince of Prestige Academy Award, & is Selected for Screening at Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival, Action on Film Festival, & Near Nazareth Festival

Ann Huang Filmmaker

Contact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Palpitations of Dust Wins Best Experimental Short Film for Prince of Prestige Academy Award, & is Selected for Screening at Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival, Action on Film Festival, & Near Nazareth Festival

August 2017: Ann Huang’s film Palpitations of Dust won Best Experimental Film for the Prince of Prestige Academy Award for 2017! 

Huang says that her debut film is solely based on her pure lyrical poems. That her biggest challenge of adapting her poetry from page to big screen was to render a narrative arc from non-lineal surrealistic poems. “Chance, happenstance, and energy of synchronicity are the centerpiece of this project, interweaving and juxtaposing frail humane emotions such as love, longing, and belonging.”

Films submitted to the Prince of Prestige Academy Award were nominated through a selection committee. The top scorers were reviewed by the festival jury and winners were announced on Saturday, July 29, 2017. More information about the Prince of Prestige Academy Award as well as other film categories and nominees can be viewed on the PAECA website as well as on IMDB

photo copy 4

Palpitations of Dust has also been officially accepted to be screened at the the Hollywood Dreamz International Film Festival (HDIFF) and Action on Film Festival (AOFFEST). Both events will run concurrently and will host black tie award celebrations from August 24th through August 26th, 2017 at the Palms Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

HDIFF is an international film festival that brings together talented experts and newcomers from film, entertainment, and writing. More information about the festival can be found here. The Action on Film Festival is an annual event that features films from all genres including features, shorts, experimental, animation, music videos, and action sequences. Learn more about AOFFEST here.

Action on Film 2017 Acceptance Laurels

Palpitations of Dust is also a semi-finalist for the 2nd annual Malta Film Festival this year. The festival will take place on August 24th and 25th, 2017 at Eden Cinemas, located in St Julian’s, Malta. The Malta Film festival features a selection of diverse films from Europe, South America, as well as the rest of the world. More information can be found here.

Malta Semifinalist

Additionally, Palpitations of Dust has been selected for the Near Nazareth Festival in the Experimental Category for Winter 2017. The film showcases five surrealist poems and will be screened at the festival which will take place in Afula, Israel from December 13th through December 17th, 2017.

The Near Nazareth Festival has been ranked as one of the 100 Best Reviewed Festivals on FilmFreeway and features work by filmmakers from 70 different countries. The Experimental category for the Near Nazareth Festival can be viewed here.

2017_Participant (1)

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

2017 Nice Independent Filmmaker & Auckland International Film Festivals Nominate & Screen “Palpitations of Dust”

Ann Huang FilmmakerContact
Ann Huang
Independent Filmmaker
Phone: (949) 280-5290
huang.yuwei.ann@gmail.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 2017 Nice Independent Filmmaker & Auckland International Film Festivals Nominate & Screen “Palpitations of Dust”

June 2017: The 2017 Nice International Filmmaker Festival nominated Ann Huang for their Talented New Filmmaker Award. In addition, her film “Palpitations of Dust” was nominated for Best Cinematography in a Short Film. The film was screened on May 18, 2017 in Nice, France.

View the screening schedule: http://filmfestinternational.com/may-18th-room-1-nice-iff-2017/

Since 2006 the festival has given Indie Filmmakers a platform to showcase their work. From humble beginnings in Tenerife, they now host events in some of Europe’s most renowned cities, including Nice, London, Amsterdam, Madrid, Berlin, and Milan.

The festival is a week-long showcasing of films that concludes with an awards ceremony gala dinner, where winners from each of category receive a prestigious trophy in recognizing their talents and achievements.

The renowned festivals also include workshops, guest speakers, film premieres, director Q&As, networking events, and much more. The events support filmmakers around the world by establishing and connecting a profoundly rich community of like-minded individuals.

Learn more about the festival in Nice as well as upcoming festivals in other cities by visiting http://filmfestinternational.com/

The Auckland International Filmmaker Festival jury selected Ann Huang’s film, “Palpitations of Dust,” for their autumn session awards.

The acclaimed Auckland Film Festival provides support to independent film-makers through reviewing, judging, marketing, and networking. In addition, the festival aids filmmakers in overcoming any obstacles which potentially hinder the artist’s ability to create.

Official_Selection_Autumn_2017_Color

Visit http://www.aiff.co.nz/ to learn more.

About Ann Huang

Ann Huang was born and raised in Mainland China and her passion for words dates back to her childhood. World literature and theatrical performances became dominating forces during her linguistic training at various educational institutions. As a first generation Chinese American, Huang possesses a unique global perspective on the past, present and future of Latin America, the United States and China. She is an MFA candidate from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has authored two poetry collections. For more information, visit http://annhuang.com.

Meshes of the Afternoon by Maya Deren

Poetry & Film Fuse in the Works of Maya Deren

Meshes of the Afternoon by Maya Deren

One of the most influential filmmakers in American cinema and a pioneer in dance films, Maya Deren (1917-1961) believed the function of film was to offer a viewer an experience that would evoke new conclusions. As with her poetry, Deren’s focus continually evolved and remained dynamic as she combined her interests in subjective psychology, dance and Haitian culture in her short films. Deren’s best-known and most influential experimental film, Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), beautifully combines poetic elements with cinematic devices. In 2015, the BBC hailed it as one of the top 100 greatest American films. Deren’s popular cinematic works also include At Land, Ritual in Transfigured Time, Meditation in Violence, and A Study in Choreography for Camera.

Maya Deren best expressed her view of the freedoms of independent cinema when she said, “Artistic freedom means that the amateur filmmaker is never forced to sacrifice visual drama and beauty to a stream of words…to the relentless activity and explanations of a plot…nor is the amateur production expected to return profit on a huge investment by holding the attention of a massive and motley audience for 90 minutes…Instead of trying to invent a plot that moves, use the movement of wind, or water, children, people, elevators, balls, etc. as a poem might celebrate these. And use your freedom to experiment with visual ideas; your mistakes will not get you fired.”

‘Meshes of the Afternoon’ and its Influence

Using a second-hand Bolex camera, Deren and husband Alexander Hammid created Meshes of the Afternoon. It was the first narrative work in avant-garde American film, establishing the New American Cinema. The editing and filming techniques used in the short have a deep sense of rhythm and create a sense of continued motion through discontinued space, conveying a deeper meaning of discomfort and distrust. The abandoning of the concepts of space and time in the film, the juxtaposition of shots, and multiple views of “self” convey a stream of consciousness that breaks viewer expectations.

Compelling themes throughout Deren’s work include reflection, dreaming, vision, ritual, identity and rhythm. Meshes of the Afternoon directly inspired David Lynch, John Coney, Su Friedrich, Stan Brakhage, Kenneth Anger and other major traditional and experimental filmmakers.

Deren on the Freedoms of Independent Cinema

When discussing the liberties of independent cinema, Deren was opposed to Hollywood’s practices and standards. She felt that artistic freedom meant never sacrificing visual beauty and drama to spoken lines and explanations of plot. Deren took advantage of movements that happened naturally—the wind blowing, balls bouncing, water running—rather than invent plots. She stated that when an artist uses his or her freedom to experiment with visual ideas, mistakes are forgiven.

At the 1953 Poetry and Film Symposium, Deren stated that poetry “is an approach to experience.” She explained that a poem’s structure makes it distinct. Its construct is the result of a situation’s vertical investigation, as it looks into a moment’s implications, qualities and depth. Deren stated that the result is poetry that doesn’t focus on what’s happening, but on how a situation feels or means.

Filmmaker and Poet, Ann Huang, has long been inspired by the Deren’s works. Cinematic and poetic visions influenced her first film, Palpitations of Dust. Reviews received from a film festival’s screening committee further support that Huang’s work reflects the freedom ideas promoted by Maya Deren:

“Interesting juxtaposition of the actors and artwork with the poems.”

“Loved the dichotomy of the Renaissance art with the visuals of the film.”

Surrealists suggest that art is a part of life. Therefore, it is vital that filmmaking be viewed as pure and keen as automatic writing or poetry writing. Poetry, filmmaking and other forms of art make the invisible, undocumented moments in an individual’s life tangible. For example, these moments are eloquent yet mysterious, wise yet innocent, and charismatic yet elusive. The portion of existence that survives without an audience must be preserved for an artist to remain whole.

poetry translation

How Culture and Literature Intertwine During Poetry Translation

poetry translationIn the United States, a trainer is an individual who teaches skills. In Great Britain, it is an athletic shoe. A bog in the U.S. is a swamp. In Great Britain, it’s a toilet. In Oregon, a buggy is an old-fashioned term for a stroller, horse carriage or car. In North Carolina, it’s a modern term for a shopping cart.

Even when nations speak the same language, the cultures within it greatly influence what different words mean. When translating poetry, an individual must take a broad idea that can be interpreted in many different ways and translate it into a recognizable, familiar idea that remains true to the original text. The skill is a subject activity and multi-faceted process tangled with linguistic and cultural restraints that lends itself to new interpretations that the original poet may have never imagined.

Cultural Considerations When Translating Poetry

Literary and Cultural Understanding and Bias

One of the most challenging tasks when translating poetry is communicating culture-specific ideas because a translation isn’t just affected by the poet’s culture, but also the translator’s understanding of and biases toward the poet’s and target’s culture. Ancient Romans understood this during their conquests. To introduce Romans to Greek culture, for example, Roman translators carefully imitated Grecian stylistic elements to keep the literature as faithful to the original literature as possible. After conquering Greece, however, Roman translators did not feel the need to pay as much attention to preserving the integrity of the original texts. Instead, they adapted the texts as a way of demonstrating Roman literary achievements. As a result, the translations didn’t serve as an imitation or interpretation; they were the competition. The translations accommodated Roman views of Grecian society. This was not the first culture to do this, nor will it be the last.

Metaphors

Metaphors are one of the most important elements of figurative language and are often ripe with culture-specific undertones. They contain the core of a poet’s message and serve as a source of enrichment for the target audience. Because metaphors often relate to a culture’s customs and history, they may create unique difficulties in translations.

Metaphors born of traditions, religious beliefs, geographical surroundings, environment and historical events are sometimes difficult to translate. In English, for instance, the word dog is relatively neutral. An individual might say a lottery winner is a lucky dog. In Chinese, the word dog may have a derogatory connotation and be a word used to describe someone who is snobby or mean. When a metaphor in the original language does not make sense in the target language, an individual might have to translate metaphors using similes to retain the original idea or image.

Allusions

Allusions in poetry can be just as difficult, if not more difficult, to translate if the cultures in question did not share the same history or texts. When an Arab poet alludes to Qu’ranic texts, for example, a Western reader might not understand the scriptural origins. In such instances, a translator might have to provide a reader with footnotes, glossary or other notes to explain the context of the idea.

Translating the nuances found in poetry is a complicated yet vital task. When a translator sees culture as a collection of experiences that give daily life its form, the individual links more than just words; she links worlds.

5 Things to Know about Surrealist Poetry

surrealism

André Breton’s Le Manifeste du Surréalism (Manifesto of Surrealism) in 1924 sparked a cultural movement that unlocked limits. Surrealist artistic philosophy follows the premise that Breton set forth—that “omnipotence of dreams” and “disinterested play of thought” take precedence over logic and reason. The forefathers of the movement felt inspired by ideas surrounding the power of unconscious thought, and used writing and art to reconcile the unconscious mind with rational life.

A Guide to Surrealist Poetry

1. Beginnings in Dadaism and Freudian inspiration: The Surrealist movement grew out of Dadaism, which broke codes regarding society’s accepted values and conventions. Surrealism aimed to be an instrument of knowledge, as those who followed the movement believed that the subconscious contained true reality. Poets who followed the surrealist movement agreed with Freud’s theory that the unconscious mind is deeper than the conscious mind.

2. A higher reality and point sublime: Surrealism involves the concept of a reality that is higher than the reality that individuals experience in everyday life. Poets who followed the movement focused on the reality created by the waking consciousness, which unites imagination and the real world, subjectivity and objectivity, and dream states and wakefulness. Breton stated in The Communication Vessels that the real and dream worlds are the same; the mind in each state of being communicates like two connected vessels. This principle is also known as point sublime, which is the realization of surreal unity—the point at which contrasts merge, such as life and death, beauty and ugliness, the past and future.

3. The marvelous and objective chances: The concept of the marvelous, or aggravated beauty, had a large role in Surrealist poems. Marvelous concepts depicted in these poems portray the ongoing anxiety that underlies the human experience. The involuntary shudder that marvelous images cause is the result of objective chances—the juxtaposition of two terms that seemed to conflict with each other, but are secretly related.

4. Delirious love: Following Breton’s lead in the Second Manifesto, Surrealists celebrate love as the only idea that unites every individual to the idea of life, even if for a brief moment. Therefore, passionate commitment is a liberating force.

5. Automatic writing: Some surrealist writers used automatism. This means that as a poet writes, there is no conscious control over thoughts. She or he writes whatever comes to mind. According to Breton, a Surrealist poet should not filter, select or shape his or her writing. The words should be raw and vivid.

Examples of Classic Surrealist Poetry

Choose Life (excerpt)
Choose life instead of those prisms with no depth even if their colors are purer
Instead of this hour always hidden instead of these terrible vehicles of cold flame
Instead of these overripe stones
Choose this heart with its safety catch…
-André Breton

Arp
Turns without reflections to the curves without smiles of shadows with mustaches, registers the murmurs of speed, the miniscule terror, searches under some cold cinders for the smallest birds, those which never close their wings, resist the wind.
-Paul Éluard

Series
For the splendour of the day of happinesses in the air
To live the taste of colours easily
To enjoy loves so as to laugh
To open eyes at the final moment
She has every willingness.
– Paul Éluard

Enigmas (excerpt)
You’ve asked me what the lobster is weaving there with
his golden feet?
I reply, the ocean knows this.
You say, what is the ascidia waiting for in its transparent
bell? What is it waiting for?
I tell you it is waiting for time, like you…
-Pablo Neruda

Mobius Strip
The track I’m running on
Won’t be the same when I turn back
It’s useless to follow it straight
I’ll return to another place
I circle around but the sky changes
Yesterday I was a child
I’m a man now
The world’s a strange thing
And the rose among the roses
Doesn’t resemble another rose.
-Robert Desnos

[Photo from Ian Palmer via CC License 2.0]